Abenaki Indians

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see book [http://134.241.121.88/ipac20/ipac.jsp?profile=man&source=~!horizon&view=subscriptionsummary&uri=full=3100001~!338129~!0&ri=5&aspect=subtab783&menu=search&ipp=20&spp=20&staffonly=&term=abenaki+warrior&index=.GW&uindex=&aspect=subtab783&menu=search&ri=5#focus Abenaki Warrior: the Life and Times of Chief Escumbuit] by Alfred E. Kayworth
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In 1698, Escumbuit, an Abenaki Indian and thirty of his tribesman attacked and killed Pasco Chubb and his wife in Andover. The attack was probably retribution. In 1696, during King William's War, Chubb was in charge of Fort William Henry on the Maine coast. At this time 3 chiefs and other Native Americans met for the purpose of exchanging prisoners. However, in a ruthless attack, Chubb had 2 of the chiefs murdered, along with 2 other Indians, while the remaining men were taken hostage. Chubb eventually was stripped of his command, imprisoned and accused of cowardice. Once released on bail, he returned to Andover. Not long after Chubb was killed in the raid. Colonel Bradstreet and his family were also captured but subsequently released.
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article in Eagle Tribune, 7-1-98, pgs 25-26
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Diaries show two different dates for the attack, according to Sarah Bailey on February 22 or March 4, 1698. <br>
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his book mentions Glenda Schaake, reference librarian!
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The Abenaki Indians were being hunted to extinction in the mid to late 1700's for their scalps.
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attack on Andover Feb.22 or March 4, 1698
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See:
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*[http://andover.mvlc.org/opac/en-US/skin/default/xml/rdetail.xml?r=338129&t=Abenaki%20Warrior%3A%20the%20Life%20and%20Times%20of%20Chief%20Escumbuit&tp=title&l=5&d=1&hc=1&rt=title ''Abenaki Warrior: the Life and Times of Chief Escumbuit, Big Island Pond, 1665 - 1727: French Hero! British Monster! Indian Patriot''] B Escumbuit, AB by Alfred E. Kayworth mentions Andover Reference Librarian Glenda Schaake.
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*[http://andover.mvlc.org/opac/en-US/skin/default/xml/rdetail.xml?r=103693&t=Historical%20Sketches%20of%20Andover&tp=title&l=5&d=1&hc=5&rt=title''Historical Sketches of Andover''] by Sarah Loring Bailey, (974.45 Bai), pages 182 and 183.
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* Article in ''Eagle Tribune'', July 1, 1998, pages 25-26
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* [[Scalp Hunters]]
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*"Pascoe Chubb: murderer and coward," ''Andover Townsman'', December 13, 2012, p. 12.
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--[[User:Eleanor|Eleanor]] 17:21, February 2, 2006 (EST)<br>
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--[[User:Kim|Kim]] 15:40, May 9, 2013 (EDT)
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Current revision

In 1698, Escumbuit, an Abenaki Indian and thirty of his tribesman attacked and killed Pasco Chubb and his wife in Andover. The attack was probably retribution. In 1696, during King William's War, Chubb was in charge of Fort William Henry on the Maine coast. At this time 3 chiefs and other Native Americans met for the purpose of exchanging prisoners. However, in a ruthless attack, Chubb had 2 of the chiefs murdered, along with 2 other Indians, while the remaining men were taken hostage. Chubb eventually was stripped of his command, imprisoned and accused of cowardice. Once released on bail, he returned to Andover. Not long after Chubb was killed in the raid. Colonel Bradstreet and his family were also captured but subsequently released.

Diaries show two different dates for the attack, according to Sarah Bailey on February 22 or March 4, 1698.

The Abenaki Indians were being hunted to extinction in the mid to late 1700's for their scalps.


See:


--Eleanor 17:21, February 2, 2006 (EST)
--Kim 15:40, May 9, 2013 (EDT)

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