Andover - Census Tract

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Definition of a census tract from [http://factfinder.census.gov ''American Factfinder'']: "A small, relatively permanent statistical subdivision of a county delineated by a local committee of census data users for the purpose of presenting data.Designed to be relatively homogeneous units with respect to population characteristics, economic status, and living conditions at the time of establishment, census tracts average about 4,000 inhabitants."
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Definition of a census tract from [http://factfinder.census.gov ''American Factfinder'']: "A small, relatively permanent statistical subdivision of a county delineated by a local committee of census data users for the purpose of presenting data. Designed to be relatively homogeneous units with respect to population characteristics, economic status, and living conditions at the time of establishment, census tracts average about 4,000 inhabitants."
--[[User:Eleanor|Eleanor]] 14:59, June 15, 2006 (EDT)
--[[User:Eleanor|Eleanor]] 14:59, June 15, 2006 (EDT)

Current revision

  • A map of the census tracts for Andover can be found in the Andover Vertical File.


Definition of a census tract from American Factfinder: "A small, relatively permanent statistical subdivision of a county delineated by a local committee of census data users for the purpose of presenting data. Designed to be relatively homogeneous units with respect to population characteristics, economic status, and living conditions at the time of establishment, census tracts average about 4,000 inhabitants."

--Eleanor 14:59, June 15, 2006 (EDT)

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